Conference Archives > 2006


NASIG 21st Annual Conference


May 4-7, 2006
Denver, Colorado

Conference Schedule 

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 PRE-CONFERENCES

(Lunch will not be provided at the pre-conferences, but all locations have food available nearby.)

Pre-Conference Rates:
2-day pre-conference, members: $150
2-day pre-conference, non-members: $175
Half-day pre-conference, members: $75
Half-day pre-conference, non-members: $100


1. Basic Serials Cataloging (two-day program)

May 3, 2006 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
May 4, 2006 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Presenter:

Joe Hinger
Associate Director of Library Technical Services
St. John's University

Location The Auraria Library on the Auraria Campus (can be reached easily from the hotel via light rail and a short walk. The light rail fare is $1.50 each way.) Directions to the preconference sites.

Description A two-day version of the SCCTP Basic Serials Cataloging workshop.


2. Advanced Serials Cataloging (two-day program)

May 3, 2006 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
May 4, 2006 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Presenter:

Steve Shadle
Serials Cataloger
University of Washington

Location The University of Colorado at Denver building on the edge of the Auraria Campus (can be reached by the free 16th Street Mall shuttle and a short walk). Directions to the preconference sites.

Description A two-day version of the SCCTP Advanced Serials Cataloging workshop focusing on the areas of the serials catalog record of interest to those attending (identified by needs assessment). Also included would be additional supplemental exercises to provide more 'hands-on' activity. This would be a natural follow-up to Karen Darling's successful Beginning Serials Cataloging workshop of two years ago.


3. Mapping License Language for Electronic Resource Management (half-day program)
March 31 Update: This Pre-Conference is Full. Please contact June Garner - jgarner@library.msstate.edu - to get on a waiting list.


May 4, 2006 8:00 a.m.-noon

Presenters:

Tim Jewell
Director of Information Resources, Collections, and Scholarly Communication
University of Washington in Seattle

Trisha Davis
Associate Professor and Head
Serials and Electronic Resources Department
The Ohio State University Libraries

Diane Grover
Electronic Resources Coordinator
University of Washington Libraries

Location: Marriott Hotel: Mattie Silks Room

Description: Building on the successful ARL/DLF pre-conference workshop at the ALA annual conference in June 2005, this workshop will take an in-depth look at the ERMI data elements, subset for Terms of Use (course packs, etc.). The workshop will explore issues and provide participants hands-on practice for analyzing licenses and summarizing key points for their Electronic Resource Management systems. Target audience: librarians, publishers, vendors with substantial experience in license issues. Most useful for librarians whose libraries have an ERM system.


4. How to Implement an Institutional Repository (half-day program)

May 4, 2006 8:00 a.m.-noon

Presenter:

Carol Hixson
Head of Metadata & Digital Library Services
University of Oregon

Location: Marriott Hotel : Denver 1-2

Description: Serials specialists are dealing with the tensions of an imbalance in the scholarly communication process created by increasing scholarly output and the decreasing ability of libraries to provide access to that output due to inflating journal costs. Institutional repositories have been promoted as one strategy for redefining and balancing the scholarly communication model. The University of Oregon Libraries have been exploring an institutional repository approach since April 2003. This pre-conference is a hands-on session on the rationale for establishing an institutional repository that will cover technical, resource, policy and marketing issues involved in establishing an institutional repository. We will also discuss the challenges and opportunities that repositories face and examine the efficacy of repositories for changing the nature of scholarly communication.

 

VISION SESSIONS


1. Things Fall Apart

Friday, May 5, 2006 8:15 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Presenter:

Robin Sloan
Online Studio Futurist
Current TV

Description: "It's happening everywhere: Media is becoming digitized and disaggregated, free to float across the internet and get downloaded and uploaded, blogged and sold, pirated and appreciated, remixed and reimagined. Some domains, like newspapers and the music business, have already been upended; others, like TV, are looking shaky. So what about libraries and scholarly communication? What's next for the academy?"


2. All the News that's Fit to Digitize: Creating Colorado's Historic Newspaper Collection

Saturday, May 6, 2006 8:10 a.m. - 9:10 a.m.

Presenter:

Brenda Bailey-Hainer
Director of Networking and Resource Sharing
Colorado State Library

Description: Colorado's Historic Newspaper Collection (CHNC) currently includes 86 newspapers published in Colorado from 1859 to 1928, totaling over 291,000 pages. Newspapers come from 46 cities and 34 counties throughout the state, which were published in English, German, Spanish, or Swedish. The process of creating this increasingly important resource involved staff from the Colorado Historical Society, Colorado State Library, and Collaborative Digitization Program. Bailey-Hainer will speak about the process behind creation of the resource (including selection criteria, technical and historic language issues), usability testing (particularly with educators) to improve the interface, and long-term sustainability of the collection to maintain what is currently available as well as adding content on a monthly basis.


3. What's a Serial When You're Running On Internet Time?

Sunday, May 7, 2006 8:15 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Presenter:

T. Scott Plutchak
Director of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Description: In the digital world, the boundaries between the traditional categories of "serials" and "monographs" are becoming blurred. When we license the electronic version of a textbook that is updated continually on an irregular basis, are we dealing with a monograph or a serial or a database? When individual articles are increasingly available as preprints or postprints, with multiple versions available in institutional repositories, journal websites, or authors' personal websites, are the traditional control mechanisms of volume and issue still relevant? Has the very notion of "serials" become hopelessly anachronistic? Radical reinvention among serials librarians is required if we are going to effectively manage the complex information space in which we now find ourselves.

 


STRATEGY SESSIONS

Strategy Set I

1. FRBR in the Real World

Strategy Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Presenters:

Paul J. Weiss
Head of the Monographs Cataloging Division
University of California at San Diego

Steve Shadle
Serials Access Librarian
University of Washington

Description: Come see FRBR in action! We will present several real-life serial case studies and lead discussions with the audience about the ways FRBR's conceptual model might be applied to each. Which cases are straightforward? Which are complex and merit further work by the developers of FRBR? We will also present mockups of ILS screens to show how these decisions might affect staff and public use of our data and systems. Come fine-tune your FRBR abilities, and contribute to the ongoing community discussions toward the refinement of the FRBR model.

 

2. Small and Medium Publishers in an E-World: Thinking Out of the Box

Strategy Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 0:45 a.m. - 12:15p.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Presenters:

Zachary Rolnik
President and Publisher
now publishers

Sean O'Doherty
Vice President of Sales
BE Press

Ezra Ernest
CEO
Swets Information Services Inc.

Description: The publications of small and medium publishers are often a critical part of library collections. At the same time, these publishers face many challenges as they compete in an e-world with market players who have much greater resources at their disposal. As a result, smaller publishers often offer unique publishing concepts, business models and delivery options. The panel will look at how these publishers are managing in this new environment, explore their relationships with libraries, subscription agents and other vendors. They will review the market forces behind their idea, the business realities they face in launching a new and innovative product, and their experiences in end-user and library communities. The panel will include two publishers offering their perspectives on this issue and a subscription agent providing both the library and vendor perspective.

 

3. The Changing Landscape of Serials: Open Access Journals in the Public Catalog

Strategy Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Presenters:

Nancy Newsome
Head of Collection Development & Serials
Western Carolina University

Krista Schmidt
Reference Librarian
Western Carolina University

Description: In recent years, the open access movement has been gaining ground in the world of scholarly communication. One of the main avenues that open access utilizes is journals wherein access to articles is absolutely free. In this session, we will examine both collection development and technical issues related to including open access journals in an academic library's online catalog. Some of the pros and cons we will detail include the possible alleviation of budget constraints, providing more robust holdings, difficulties of maintaining titles, and indexing for access.

 

4. The UC/JSTOR Paper Repository: Progress Thus Far

Strategy Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Presenters:

Jeff Sundquist
UC Shared Print Librarian
UCLA Southern Regional Library Facility

John Kiplinger
Director of Production
JSTOR

Nancy Kushigian
Director of Shared Print Collections
University of California

Colleen Carlton
Director of the Southern Regional Library Facility
University of California

Description: In October, 2004, the University of California entered into a two-year contract with JSTOR (Journal Storage) to establish from its journal runs across all UC campuses a paper repository of 14,000,000 pages (500+ titles). This "dim" archive--accessible to only UC and JSTOR--would benefit both JSTOR in terms of having a complete print backfile available, and UC in terms of cost and space savings from maintaining several copies of low-use titles. Since January, 2005, the task of establishing system-wide support and collaboration, planning and beginning the actual operation itself, and creating strict but realistic guidelines for finding the best UC copy and then validating it (page by page) has been enormous. NASIG may be the best place to discuss the process thus far, in case similar interest exists elsewhere, and to receive valuable feedback from peers.

 

5. Envisioning the Future of ERM Systems

Strategy Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 9:15 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Presenters:

Tim Jewell
Head of Collection Management
University of Washington

Theodore A. Fons
Product Manager
Innovative Interfaces

Description: The development of Electronic Resource Management systems has shown remarkable progress in the past five years. A number of visionary librarians started by developing local systems, and the DLF's Electronic Resource Management Initiative ("ERMI") built on that work by articulating what ERM systems should do. Library system vendors responded by rapidly producing ERM systems to match these requirements, but while current systems do match them, they may not meet some more advanced, emerging needs. This presentation will explore these needs and present visions for the further evolution of ERM systems to address them, including early results from a second DLF project called "ERMI II" and new initiatives to improve the harvesting of usage statistics. Outcomes of this presentation include an improved understanding of electronic resource management issues and identification of new ideas from panelists and audience members.

 

Strategy Set II

1. Journal Pricing 10 Years Later

Strategy Set II
Friday, May 5, 2006 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 9:30a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Presenters:

Tina Feick
Vice President for Customer Relations
Swets Information Services Inc.

Bob Boissy
Manager of Agent Relations
Springer

Leslie Knapp
Director of Client Relations
EBSCO Information Services

Description: The Journal Pricing Season starts in July (slowly) and builds through December of each year. This workshop describes how the season affects librarians, publishers and agents. The electronic age has dramatically changed the process and the focus will be on the effects of these changes. Included will be the publisher's decision process to the agent's loading of prices and on through the librarian's assessment of charges. In addition, there will be a discussion on how agents determine service charges and other fees. (The original workshop was given at the 1994 Conference in Vancouver.)

 

2. Getting from Here to There, Safely

Strategy Set II
Friday, May 5, 2006 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 9:30a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Presenter:

Roger C. Schonfeld
ITHAKA

Description: Most analyses of the transition away from print to electronic journals focus on either publishers or libraries, but the interdependencies between libraries and publishers are vital. A major class of journal titles seems to have no transition path to electronic publishing, which can be viewed both as a significant opportunity and a significant risk for scholarly communications. And many smaller journals publishers have not yet fully faced up to challenges of electronic-only publishing, which may cause significant concerns not only for them but for libraries and scholarship as well. For publishers and libraries alike, plans for an electronic-only publishing environment need to consider not only the management of a gradual transition but the possibility that we reach a dramatic tipping-point. And in this transition, archiving and preservation issues deserve consideration as part of the strategy for the transition to an electronic-only environment, both for the electronic format and the legacy print collections. Focusing on these key issues and several others, and based on detailed economic studies of both publishers and libraries, this session will attempt to provide a holistic view of the digital transformation especially for serials librarians.

 

3. The State of Scholarly Communications: An Environmental Scan of Emerging Issues, Pitfalls, and Possibilities

Strategy Set II
Friday, May 5, 2006 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 9:30a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Presenter:

Lee Van Orsdel
Dean of University Libraries
Grand Valley State University

Description: An overview of the issues that are swirling around in the scholarly communications environment, including the evolving arenas of public policy, faculty advocacy, and open access agendas in their many and varied forms, with a shot at the issues coming over the horizon.

 

4. How Did We Ever Manage without the OpenURL?

Strategy Set II
Friday, May 5, 2006 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 9:30a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Presenters:

Jenni Walker
Ex Libris

Janet Chisman
Head of Serials and Electronic Resources
Washington State University

Description: The OpenURL, first introduced in 2000, revolutionized the world of linking for libraries and their patrons. Six years on, OpenURL link resolvers have become a core technology component in the library infrastructure. This session will review how effective link resolvers are in delivering full-text to the patron's desktop. It will also review some additional creative uses of link resolvers including efficient document delivery and the generation of serials holdings statements to populate Google Scholar and OCLC WorldCat.

 

5. Mountains, Valleys, and Pathways: Serials Users' Needs and Steps to Meet Them

Strategy Set II
Friday, May 5, 2006 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 9:30a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Presenters:

Regina Romano Reynolds
Head of the National Serials Data Program
U.S. ISSN Center

Lynn Silipigni Connaway
Consulting Research Scientist
OCLC Office of Research

Description: Increased focus on meeting user needs prompted by FRBR, RDA, and tight budgets makes knowing those needs and finding new ways to meet them more urgent than ever. Lynn Silipigni Connaway will present serials- and cataloging-related information gathered from focus group and individual interviews conducted as part of research on the hows and whys of meeting the information needs of students and faculty. This research was funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Ohio State, and OCLC. Regina Romano Reynolds will describe the user-focused nature of both the Access Level Record for Serials and the revised ISSN standard. Reynolds will also discuss outcomes of the Access-Level Record pilot projects, highlight changes in the draft revised ISSN standard following the first ISO vote, and provide an update on development of a potential data distribution service from the ISSN International Centre.

 


TACTICS SESSIONS


Tactics Set I

1. E-Resources = E-Opportunity: Connecting Systems, Technical Services and Patrons

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenters:

Betty Landesman
Head of Collection Management
NIH

Sharon Wiles-Young
Director of Library Access Services
Lehigh University

Description: Libraries are on a continuous quest to provide the best access to electronic resources. How do we connect patrons to electronic resources? What changes are needed in our organizations, staffing, and workflows to provide effective electronic resource management? What strategies are we using to implement new technology and to leverage our existing systems? This session will examine the approaches of two libraries, one academic and one special, to providing excellent customer service by examining and streamlining workflow, creating more linkage between diverse systems, and maximizing the expertise of technical services staff.

 

2. Looking for a Link: Comparing Faculty Citations Pre and Post Big Deals THIS TACTICS SESSION HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenter:

Don Taylor
Electronic Resources Librarian
Simon Fraser University

Description: Libraries and publishers often present Big Deals as a way of making available to researchers a wide array of scholarly research that was formerly not provided by the library. The Simon Fraser University Library compared SFU faculty citations from 1993 & 1998 (pre Big Deal) and 2004 (and 2005) to determine if there is a correlation between availability of Big Deal e-journals to researchers and their citation of journals from these publishers. Will present the findings and discuss what conclusions can be drawn and also what else needs to be analyzed to measure impact of Big Deals at a university.


3. Crawling out of the Web: Alternative Citations Sources

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenter:

Deborah Lee
Coordinator of the Library Instructional Services Department
Mississippi State University

Description: The ISI citation indexes have long served as the gold standard for bibliometric research. The subscription price of the ISI citation indexes reflected the unique nature of these research tools. This session will compare the ISI Web of Science citation databases to both free resources (Google Print and Google Scholar) and to alternative subscription-based resources (such as MathSciNet and EBSCO's Academic Search Premier.) Strategies for using these resources for both instructional purposes and as collection development tools will be examined.

 

4. Blogs, Wikis, and Podcasts: Social Software in the Library

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenter:

Abigail Bordeaux
Electronic Resources Librarian
Binghamton University

Description: Social software is software that "lets people rendezvous, connect or collaborate by use of a computer network" (Wikipedia; site accessed 10/10/05). This session will define blogs, wikis, and podcasts - some of the most common types of social software - and briefly put them into the context of the social software revolution currently taking place on the web. Binghamton University's blogs and wiki will be demonstrated and discussed, as will its experiments with podcasting. Finally, there will be ample time for discussion of the role of these tools in libraries.


5. Climbing Peaks and Navigating Valleys: Managing Personnel from High Altitude

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenter:

Jeff Slagell
Interim Director of Library Services
Delta State University

Description: The management of library staff can be a daily challenge, even for the most seasoned library director. It's not unusual for librarians to find themselves supervising faculty, staff, and students with little or no relevant experience. Unfortunately, the transition from serials processing to personnel issues is not always an easy one. This workshop will provide practical knowledge about personnel management and other related issues. Specifically, it will address the importance of communication, establishing expectations, consistency, mentoring, evaluations, and policy making. In addition, the speaker will discuss dealing with turnover and disciplinary problems. Audience participation will be encouraged throughout the presentation.

 

6. Old Is New Again: Using Established Workflows to Handle Electronic Resources

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenter:

Amanda Yesilbas
Assistant Serials Librarian
Florida Atlantic University

Description: Florida Atlantic University was struggling with the overwhelming task of changing from print to online resources. The serials unit was left trying to make sense of and insure access to electronic resources. Instead of reinventing the wheel, FAU turned to established check in procedures similar to print procedures with a great deal of success. The process used a combination of tools already available and a homegrown database. This tactics session would make a case for how electronic check in can be helpful for serials acquisition and management. The presentation would use FAU as a case study for the types of problems identified and overcome throughout the course of the year.

 

7. The Shape of Things to Come: Resource Description and Access (RDA)

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenter:

Ed Jones
National University

Description: An overview of the new cataloging code, RDA, especially as it relates to serials. Items covered will include the background and organization of RDA; its relationship to FRBR, the draft Statement of International Cataloguing Principles, and MARC 21; and expected changes from current practice (such as replacements for the current suite of GMDs).

 

8. To Train or Not to Train

Tactics Set I
Friday, May 5, 2006 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. repeated Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:10 p.m. - 2:10 p.m.

Presenters:

Rick Anderson
Director of Resource Acquisition
University of Nevada, Reno

Kittie Henderson
Academic Sales Manager
EBSCO Information Services

Description: What do you say when a vendor offers to come teach your staff how to use its products? When should you jump at the opportunity, and when should you stop and think before saying yes? How do you prepare for training, and what can you do to make it more effective? Rick (a librarian) and Kittie (a vendor rep) will present their perspectives on these important questions, discussing the larger issues involved and offering practical tips and suggestions to help you get the most out of your investment of staff time.

 


Tactics Set II

1. Electronic Resource Management

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenters:

Janet Chismann
Head of Serials and Electronic Resources
Washington State University

Greg Matthews
Cataloging Librarian
Washington State University

Description: Electronic resource management (ERM) is critical as libraries increase online access to collections. Washington State University Libraries has recently implemented ERM software. This session will explore the factors involved in implementing a commercial ERM system. Specific issues addressed will include: cooperative maintenance of shared policy documents and a workflow database; whether to follow single or multiple record cataloging policies; assigning call numbers to ERM titles, including "free" resources; and identifying qualified staff to assume specific ERM responsibilities.

 

2. Linking the Library and Campus Course Management System

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenter:

Claire Dygert
Coordinator for the Serials and Electronic Resources Unit
American University

Description: The need to integrate online library resources with Course Management Systems (CMS) has been a hot topic in higher education literature. This workshop will discuss how American University Library has successfully addressed this need, and will provide a demonstration of their Blackboard Library site, which features LinkMaker, a locally developed Blackboard plug-in that creates proxied links to subscribed resources; the use of Blackboard to deliver e-reserves and streaming media from the library's collection; and the integration of virtual reference services and an information literacy tutorial into the CMS system. The session will discuss strategies for promoting and publicizing these services to the campus community.


3. Tackling the Reorganization Chart

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenters:

Ramona Metcalf
University of Texas at Dallas

Serenity King
Electronic Resources Librarian
University of Texas at Dallas

Description: Technical staff reorganization often creates enormous workflow confusion. Without careful planning, these movements can have a negative effect on library staff and users. This session describes the experiences of one university library staff affected by organizational changes. Topics include communication, streamlining, staff mentoring & morale, training, and, most importantly, how to maintain a sense of humor and positive work environment in the midst of organizational "chaos".


4. Mile High to Ground Level: Getting Projects Organized and Completed

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenter:

Jennifer Marill
Office of Strategic Initiatives
Library of Congress

Description: Once you know the general scope of a project, how do you organize and complete the work? At the mile high view, it's easy to think a project can accomplish it all. But most projects start out trying to accomplish too much. Using standard techniques and concepts, this workshop will discuss how to initiate, plan, execute, monitor and close a project. Particular focus will be devoted to working with stakeholders, customers and team members. How do you form an ideal project team? How do you motivate people who don't necessarily work for you? Participants will gain a better framework, as well as tips and strategies, for managing projects.

 

5. Generating E-collections Lists for Dummies: Creating a Better Electronic Reference Collection

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenters:

Char Simser
Head of Cataloging & Serials Department
Kansas State University

Mohan Ramaswamy
Science Librarian
Kansas State University

Tara Baillargeon
Social Sciences Librarian
Kansas State University

Description: Libraries buy more and more electronic reference materials which are buried in the catalog or on web pages, not to be easily found by the user. Presenters will describe how K-State librarians in serials and public services collaborated to enhance the visibility and accessibility of their electronic reference collection. Part of the process involved subverting MARC and creating a coding scheme that is used to dynamically generate lists from the OPAC for the K-State eReference collection.

 

6. Open Access and Conscious Selection

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenters:

Kitti Canepi
Head of Information Resources Management
Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Harold Way
Account Services Manager
EBSCO

Andrea Imre
Electronic Resources Librarian
Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Description: Open Access resources (OA) are becoming more important in all types of libraries. Recent discussions on OA have focused on ILS access and availability of MARC records with little attention to a selection process for deciding whether or not to provide access to OA. The presenters will outline some of the concerns with by-passing conscious selection, show how some services and systems are providing bibliographic access, offer information collected on the availability of finding aids for a group of OA titles, present selection criteria used by some database aggregators that include OA resources, and suggest possible selection process models.

 

7. Climbing the Mountain: Choosing the Best Path for Serials Record Management

Tactics Set II
Saturday, May 6, 2006 11:00 a.m. - Noon repeated Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Presenters:

Jennifer L. Edwards
Serials Cataloger Librarian
MIT Libraries

Betsy Friesen
University of Minnesota

Description: Loading vendor-supplied bibliographic records for electronic resources has become a more common practice in order to keep up with the constant additions and changes of titles, URLs, and holdings. MIT decided to continue using the single record approach for their serial record management, while the University of Minnesota opted to use separate records for print and electronic resources. Both use, or plan to use, vendor records as much as possible. In this session, each speaker will discuss their re-evaluation process and share their library's decisions. MIT will describe the process they plan to use to load vendor records, while adhering to their established single record approach. Minnesota will describe their current loading process, for the four University campuses, and the record clean-up project that resulted from the separate record decision.


8. Today's Journal Cost: Print vs. Online

Tactics Set II
Sunday, May 7, 2006 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. This session is not repeated.

Presenters:

Richard Fidczuk
Director of Production
SAGE London

Linda Beebe
Senior Director of PsycINFO
American Psychological Association

Description: For years, we have heard how much the printing costs are, including the oil-like price of paper. At the same time, we hear that the price for computers is dropping. Hard drive costs are at an all-time low and even hosting appears to be getting cheaper. So, with all of this evidence supporting the supposed cheaper pricing for online goods, why are the online costs of publications higher than just the prehistoric print? Where do these costs originate? Doesn't the end of print mark a pricing break for online goods? Will the cost of online publishing ever decrease? During this session we will discuss the factors making up production costs, print costs, and online costs. We will break down pricing and compare the differences, and lastly, we will attempt to produce the "magic bullet" or the impetus behind increased online costs. Are these costs real or just a mirage? Tune in and find out.