Conference Archives > 2008


 

NASIG 23rd Annual Conference


June 5-8, 2008
Phoenix, Arizona

Thank you to our Sponsors

Conference Schedule 

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Pre-conferences

Wednesday, June 4, 2008

1. NISO, Metadata in a Digital Age: New Models of Creation, Discovery, and Use - Full Day Pre-conference
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. [lunch provided]
Presenters:

* Kevin Cohn, Director of Client Services, Atypon Systems, Inc.
* Les Hawkins, Serial Record Division, Library of Congress
* Helen Henderson, Managing Director of Information Power, Ringgold
* Regina Reynolds, Head, U.S. ISSN Center, National Serials Data Program, Library of Congress
* Steven C. Shadle, Serials Access Librarian, University of Washington

Metadata is critical to finding content. However, the expansion of digital content and rapid changes in access and use pose tremendous challenges to the effective organization, description, and management of this information. Established cataloging practices are changing to incorporate these new forms and increased segmentation of content, and at the same time we see new and changing structures for the creation and distribution of metadata. This session will discuss the role that metadata plays in the lifecycle of content, from publisher to end user, including looking at the shifting bibliographic supply chain, various needs that metadata answers, and questions around exchange processes and how different metadata is used.

Thursday, June 5, 2008

1. Managing With Integrity - Half Day Pre-conference
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Presenters:

* Elisabeth Leonard, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
* Hollie White, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Management includes planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and assessing. Juggling all these responsibilities in a setting with employees who have disparate personalities and needs requires a large set of skills. Regardless of your position, knowing your own management style and knowing how to coach, motivate, and manage the frequent changes necessary in libraries is essential to being an effective manager. These skills will be developed in this workshop using case studies and discussion.


2. Emerging Trends, 2.0, and Libraries - Half Day Pre-conference
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Presenters:

* David Lee King, Digital Branch & Services Manager, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library

Has your library discussed creating a Flickr account? A MySpace teensite? Creating a blog? David discusses the current social networking transformation taking place, and applies those changes to a library setting. Then David will discuss the changes a library needs to make to meet and participate in our new online, participatory world.

3. 101 Things Non-catalogers Should Know About Serials? or Is It Continuing Resources?
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. [no lunch provided]
Presenter:

* Marla Chesler, Library of Congress
* Regina Reynolds, Library of Congress

What's an 856? Why doesn't my publishing company show up as the publisher in library catalog displays? Why can't my subscription agent guarantee that I receive all of my journals? Why doesn't the ISSN link work? How many ISSNs (or is it ISSN?) do I need for my journals? Why do libraries keep asking me for MARC records? Am I publishing "serials" or "continuing resources"? Although NASIG attendees all work with serials, library catalogers and acquisitions staff, publishers, subscription agents, ILS vendors and access management companies all have their own perspectives and needs. Catalogers and the records they provide result from a unique and sometimes inscrutable perspective, complete with its own language-MARC. This session will cover the basic pieces of information we should all share in order to help make sure we aren't "stung" by incorrect assumptions and miscommunications.

Vision Sessions

1. Next Generation Library Automation: Its Impact on the Serials Community

Friday, June 6, 2008
8:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
Presenter:

* Marshall Breeding, Vanderbilt University

In the upcoming years, we anticipate major changes in the realm of library automation. The upheavals have begun, with many different movements challenging the models of library automation that have prevailed for decades. The monolithic integrated library system continues to diminish in importance as libraries move toward a transition to a loosely coupled suite of applications. While the ILS continues to play a role-though ever smaller-libraries are making investments in a new generation of automation products, especially next generation interfaces more comprehensive in scope and better equipped to handle full-text electronic content. Electronic resource management systems struggle as a genre of automation products designed to handle the specialized task of helping libraries make sense of their explosively growing collections of subscribed electronic content. Sparked by recent industry events, libraries demand openness at a higher level than ever before, expressed through a tsunami of activity in the adoption of open source library automation software and in demands for open access to library data to enable better local control and integration with third party products. Specialists in serials need to be aware of, and provide input into, the emerging visions of library automation.


2. Information Shadows: Ubiquitous Computing Serializes Everyday Things

Saturday, June 7, 2008
8:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

Presenter:

* Mike Kuniavsky, ThingM

First imagined in 1991 at Xerox PARC, "Ubiquitous computing," -- the sowing of information processing into the environment is now a reality. Just as 20th century electrification and inexpensive electric motors changed hand tools into appliances, the Internet and inexpensive embedded computers are now transforming familiar objects. With the addition of networked computing, everyday things exhibit new properties. Objects have always been catalogued and counted. With near-realtime circulation of meta-data, they cast information shadows into databases and the Web. In response, we shift how we relate to these new kinds of objects. And with some objects as agents in their own right, we must consider how objects relate to each other. In this talk Mike will discuss how the nature of familiar things is rapidly transforming as their information shadows grow longer and more intertwined and why cars and purses are more like serials than you may have expected.


3. Discovery and Delivery: Making It Work for Users

Sunday, June 8, 2008
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Presenter:

* Carol Pitts Diedrichs, Dean of Libraries, University of Kentucky

User expectations for complete and immediate discovery and delivery of information have been set by their experiences in the Web 2.0 world. Libraries must respond to the needs of those users whose needs can easily be meet with Google-like discovery tools as well as those who require deeper access to our resources. What has happened to bring us to this time in the evolution of library collections and services? What characterizes user expectations and how are we fulfilling them today? What can we do to prepare for the future? Are we prepared for what is to come?

Strategy Sessions

Strategy Group I

1. Shifting Costs in the Journal Publishing World

Friday, June 6, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Presenter:

* Nawin Gupta
* Chris Beckett, Atypon Systems
* Barry Davis, Sheridan Press

The journal publishing business has undergone some profound changes in the last decade - from content creation to how readers seek and find scholarly content, and everything in between. Technology has not only changed how work is done, it has also changed where the cost centers are in the publishing process and the many ways in which information is delivered. This session will provide librarians insight into the factors that impact journal costs and ultimate pricing, and how it has changed over the past two decades. It should provide librarians with a deeper understanding of the journal publishing world, providing another perspective when reviewing budgets and making purchasing decisions. The more publishers and librarians learn about each other, the better we will be able to collaboratively work together on resource solutions in a rapidly changing age of information.


2. Real ERM Implementations: Notes from The Field

Friday, June 6, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Repeated Saturday, June 7, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Moderator:

* Ted Fons, Innovative Interfaces

Panelists:

* Karl Maria Fattig, Bowdoin College
* Jeanne Langendorfer, Bowling Green State University
* Jeff Daniels, Grand Valley State University
* Paul Moeller, University of Colorado
* Toni Katz, Colby College

In a moderated format, panelists using live ERM systems will be asked to comment on aspects of ERM implementation. Topics are: planning, data migration, license coding, public display, workflow design,etc. Each panelist will have two to three minutes to comment on each aspect with the moderator asking one panelist to elaborate on the topic in each round. The following assumption will be made clear: that audience members have a need to implement and ERM system with minimum resources for maximum impact. Panelists will be encouraged to be precise, economical and relevant to the topic and to the needs of the audience. Panelists may be using ERM systems from different vendors.


3. Institutional Repositories - Strategies for the Present and Future

Friday, June 6, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Presenters:

* Jean-Gabriel Bankier, Berkeley Electronic Press
* Connie Foster, Western Kentucky University
* Glen Wiley, Cornell University

Institutional Repositories are intended to create an alternative publishing model, enhance scholarly communication, showcase an institution's intellectual output, and preserve and provide access to an institution's digital assets. Why do university IRs struggle for content? What constitutes success? Speakers will (1) analyze success and offer strategies and tactics for making IRs a significant part of research and education,(2) will describe TopSCHOLAR (a bepress platform) and strategies and challenges involved in launching and populating it at Western Kentucky University, and (3) will offer strategies for the future of IRs focusing on the issues of the stimulus, selection, sharing, and sustainability of IRs.


4. Smoking out the Big Deal: Getting What You Want Without Getting Stung

Friday, June 6, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Presenters:

* Donna Wolfe, PALINET
* Narda Tafuri, University of Scranton
* Nowella Owen, Springer
* Rebecca Day, EBSCO

Managing electronic journal collections is an arduous and complex task. Plotting a route through the maze of pricing, subscription alternatives, licensing agreements, agent and consortial alternatives, access rights, acquisitions and transfers of titles are daunting challenges at best. In this program, four panelists, including a librarian from an academic institution, a subscription agent, a manager of a consortium and a publisher's representative, will discuss innovative and collaborative models and strategies for acquiring and managing electronic journals.


5. To Claim, or Not to Claim: Claiming Questions in the E-world

Friday, June 6, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Presenters:

* Karen Decker, Swets
* Gracemary Smulewitz, Rutgers University
* Micheline Westfall, University of Tennessee at Knoxville

As libraries shift to electronic formats, new challenges and business questions for claiming print subscriptions have arisen. While fewer print subscriptions create fewer claims, remaining claims are more likely to come from small, society and niche publishers - most of which do not have automated claiming capabilities. With limited resources, do libraries place greater value in getting these print issues, or in ensuring proper access to other e-journal titles? And if print titles are important, how can libraries and vendors streamline the claiming process? Our library and vendor panelists will address these questions and offer strategies for managing claims in today's e-environment.

Strategy Group II

1. When Did (E)-books Become Serials?

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Repeated Saturday, June 7, 2008; 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m

Presenters:

* Kim Armstrong, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)
* Bob Nardini, Coutts Information Services
* Peter McCracken, Serials Solutions
* Rick Lugg, R2 Consulting

This session will explore how E-books are much more serial-like than traditional print books. The book "container" is eroding now that publishers supply abstracts, MARC records, and DOI at the chapter level. Booksellers offer E-book packages that can be leased with annual renewal costs and options to trade content in and out. Libraries have to adjust workflow and budgets to handle monographic material that has continuing costs and may not be permanently owned. The format of the session is a panel that includes: a librarian, a bookseller/E-book aggregator, and a publisher, with a facilitator who is a consultant to libraries.


2. What They Never Told You about Vendors in Library School

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Presenters:

* Christine Stamison, Swets
* Bob Persing, University of Pennsylvania
* Chris Beckett, Atypon Systems

Dealing with vendors is a reality for librarians, especially in today's electronic environment of growing complexity and content fragmentation. Yet this is a facet that is often not addressed in library school, requiring librarians to learn the "ins and outs" and "do's and don'ts" of managing these relationships on-the-job. Our librarian and vendor panelists will offer personal insights and experiences, as well as discuss essential aspects and best practices for working with vendors to help insure that librarians get the most value from these relationships.


3. INNOVATIONS: Where Are They Now?

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Presenters:

* Selden Lamoureux, Univeristy of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
* Beth Bernhardt, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

A number of new and very exciting innovations have been developed in the past several years. Have they met expectations? Panelists in this session will take a look at some of the promising innovations of the past few years and discuss what they are, where they are, and where they might be headed in terms of development and acceptance. Some of the innovations covered: SERU (licensing), Transfer Project (title list management), SUSHI (usage statistics), PORTICO (e-archiving and perpetual access), and new uses of LOCKSS software.


4. Is There a Future for the Traditional Subscription-based Journal?

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Presenters:

* Sean O'Doherty, The Berkeley Electronic Press
* (additional speakers to be announced)

Open access repositories and Web 2.0-organized content on the one hand, author-pays and institution-pays business models for publishing on the other: one might think that professionally published subscription- based journals will soon be a thing of the past. But there are still good reasons to organize academic publishing around journals that are published by professional publishers and sold to libraries. The Berkeley Electronic Press, for example, has found a way to publish and sell journals at affordable prices, and to also allow generous access to nonsubscribers (our guest access policy). If professional subscription- based journals still have value, how to avoid throwing the baby (the value added by publishers and librarians) out with the bathwater (over-priced over-restricted journals)?


5. Real ERM Implementations: Notes from The Field

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Repeated Friday, June 6, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Moderator:

* Ted Fons, Innovative Interfaces

Panelists:

* Karl Maria Fattig, Bowdoin College
* Jeanne Langendorfer, Bowling Green State University
* Jeff Daniels, Grand Valley State University
* Paul Moeller, University of Colorado
* Toni Katz, Colby College

In a moderated format, panelists using live ERM systems will be asked to comment on aspects of ERM implementation. Topics are: planning, data migration, license coding, public display, workflow design,etc. Each panelist will have two to three minutes to comment on each aspect with the moderator asking one panelist to elaborate on the topic in each round. The following assumption will be made clear: that audience members have a need to implement and ERM system with minimum resources for maximum impact. Panelists will be encouraged to be precise, economical and relevant to the topic and to the needs of the audience. Panelists may be using ERM systems from different vendors.


Strategy Group III

1. Stung If You Do, Stung If You Don't - The Good and the Bad of the Big Deal

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 1:30 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.
Presenters:

* Steve Fallon, ACCUCOMS
* Gary Ives, Texas A&M University

The Big Deal continues to be a staple of many large libraries' collections. The attraction continues to be expanded access to unsubscribed content, with fixed predictable pricing the contract for the package. The pitfall may be that inflation even under the contract may be greater than most libraries' annual budget increases. Steve Fallon will present the results of a poll North American libraries researching what happens to a library's collection after the big deal. Gary Ives will present the results of his analysis of title level pricing of ScienceDirect subscriptions under a license existing since 1999.


2. MARC Holdings Conversion: Now That We're Here, What Do We Do?

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 1:30 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Moderator:

* Steve Shadle, University of Washington

Presenters:

* Frieda Rosenberg, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
* Ted Schwitzner, Illinois State University
* Sion Romaine, University of Washington
* Naomi Young, University of Florida

The MARC Format for Holdings Data has been around for many years and only recently has OCLC been able to accept MARC-formatted data (in the form of Local Holdings Records). This panel presentation and discussion will provide examples of recent holdings conversion projects from different local systems and of migration of existing MARC-formatted data from one ILS to another. Come learn from the people who have been through the process (some of them several times!).


3. Managing Divergence of Print and Online Journals

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 1:30 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Presenters:

* Beth Weston, National Library of Medicine
* Deena Acton, National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine appointed a working group in 2007 to examine the increasing incidence of publications with differences between the electronic and print content. The group was charged with evaluating how these differences impact article identification and retrieval, ILL services, acquisitions processes and archiving policies for NLM and its user communities. This session will present the findings of the working group and proposed solutions to some of the difficulties of managing different content in different versions of journals.


4. UKSG Project Transfer

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 1:30 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.

Presenter:

* Paul Harwood, UKSG

As any serials librarian will know, the annual movement of journals moving between publishers causes headaches. Does your institution have perpetual access rights? Who will provide ongoing access? Will the subscription price change? Where do I go to find out the information I need? These are just some of the questions that arise! Under the auspices of the United Kingdom Serials Group (UKSG), Nancy Buckley formed a working group of publishers, librarians and intermediaries to look at these issues and to suggest a set of principles to ensure that journal transfers happen more smoothly. So far, Project Transfer has released a Code of Conduct for publishers and further projects are in the pipeline. This talk will discuss the issues faced by the project, as well as talk through the principles of the Code in detail. This session will aim to provide an update on the current position of the project and to provide insight on the future of this important initiative.


5. When Did (E)-books Become Serials?

Saturday, June 7, 2008; 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
(Repeated Saturday, June 7, 2008; 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.)

Presenters:

* Kim Armstrong, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC)
* Bob Nardini, Coutts Information Services
* Peter McCracken, Serials Solutions
* Rick Lugg, R2 Consulting

This session will explore how E-books are much more serial-like than traditional print books. The book "container" is eroding now that publishers supply abstracts, MARC records, and DOI at the chapter level. Booksellers offer E-book packages that can be leased with annual renewal costs and options to trade content in and out. Libraries have to adjust workflow and budgets to handle monographic material that has continuing costs and may not be permanently owned. The format of the session is a panel that includes: a librarian, a bookseller/E-book aggregator, and a publisher, with a facilitator who is a consultant to libraries.
 

Tactics Sessions

Tactics Group I

1. Images of Academic Librarians: How Tenure-track Librarians Portray Themselves in the Promotion and/or Tenure Process

Friday, June 6, 2008; 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Presenters:

* June Garner, Mississippi State University
* Karen Davidson, Mississippi State University

Achieving promotion and/or tenure (p/t) can be a frightening experience not only for those deciding on academic librarianship as a career but for those already in a tenure-track position. How do librarians portray their unique skills and communicate their value to the academic community? The presenters will discuss preliminary results of a survey conducted of tenure-track librarians at Carnegie research institutions focusing on the respondents' research, teaching, and service activities. Examples of phrases used in actual p/t applications conveying the importance of today's academic librarian will also be shared.


2. Simplifying licensed resource access through Shibboleth

Friday, June 6, 2008; 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Presenter:

* Holly Eggleston, University of California, San Diego

Libraries spend a lot of time and effort troubleshooting and maintaining access to their licensed electronic resources, from solving remote access issues to managing lists of IP ranges with vendors. This session will highlight the work being done by the InCommon Library/Shibboleth Project, a multi-institutional effort piloting the use of Shibboleth to provide single sign-on access to library resources.


3. eBooks vs. Print: Which is the better value?

Friday, June 6, 2008; 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Presenter:

* Jonathan Bunkell, Elsevier


Within the past year eBooks have become the hot topic in STM publishing as most major publishers have announced plans to make either their entire catalogue of books, or large portions of them, available online as eBooks. While print books have been the norm for research for hundreds of years, eBooks are poised to become the next big innovation in online publishing, if the questions on pricing models, value and formatting can be answered. The ongoing print vs. eBooks debate will be discussed in this program, highlighting the benefits and shortcomings of each, and what the future will hold for academic books in libraries around the world.


4. Taking the Sting Out of Multiple Format Serials Displays

Friday, June 6, 2008; 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Presenters:

* Marsha Seamans, University of Kentucky
* Nancy Lewis, University of Kentucky

In its efforts to provide easy access to print and electronic journals through the online catalog, the University of Kentucky has instituted several display strategies over the past couple of years. The presenters will detail Voyager bib linking and SFX linking in the catalog, as well as standardized holdings notes that assist users in getting to the right resources. We will also outline the ongoing procedures and workflows in Technical Services that create these important displays and keep them current.



5. E-Resource Management in the For-profit World: Soothing the Sting

Friday, June 6, 2008; 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.

Presenters:

* Steve Oberg, Abbott Laboratories
* Sarah Morris, Reed Smith, LLP

This session will provide a revealing glimpse into the workings of two libraries in the for-profit sector: Abbott Laboratories, a major international healthcare company, and Reed Smith, LLP, a top international law firm. Core library services and value revolve around access to primarily electronic legal and scientific literature, making their inner workings of prime interest for serialists of any background. How are these libraries different from other libraries? How is a mostly virtual library at Abbott successfully expanding its reach? How to shift, in the case of Reed Smith, between feet planted in both the print and electronic worlds? These and other questions will be addressed in an informal, discussion- oriented atmosphere.



6. KBART: Best Practices in Knowledgebase Data Transfer

Friday, June 6, 1:45-2:45 pm,

Presenter:

* Peter McCracken

KBART, the "Knowledge Base And Related Tools" project, is a joint UKSG/NISO project working to define best practices for transferring data about knowledgebases between all the parties involved in the process, such as libraries, publishers, content providers, ERAMS vendors, consortia, etc. This session will present KBART's goals and seek input on how we can move forward to improve the transfer of this data.

Tactics Group II


1. Painless Decisions: Serials and Digital Initiatives

Friday, June 6, 2008; 3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Presenters:

* Mary Marshall, Independent Consultant
* Linda Barr, WebFeat, Inc.

Painless decisions for serials librarians faced with new digital initiatives-is it an oxymoron - Federated searching, e-journal lists, Google Scholar, MySpace and Microsoft's latest offering and tomorrow's next innovation demand decisions by the library's digital initiatives team, the publisher/aggregator and the information seeker. The objective is to use real, but disguised scenarios from the perspective of each group. From this information participants can better understand how and why decisons are made and watch for similar situations in their own situations. Two presentors will provide the scenarios using PowerPoint presentations.


2. Harnessing the Spiderweb : Collaborative Serial Maintenance, Challenges and Solutions at UC

Friday, June 6, 2008; 3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Presenters:

* Sarah Gardner, University of California, Davis
* Melissa Beck, University of California, Los Angeles
* Valerie Bross, University of California, Los Angeles

Serials cataloging is changing at a rapid pace. In order to meet local needs while providing greater efficiency on a consortial and national level, the University of California's CONSER Funnel Project was established in 2006. Interested UC campuses received high-quality training to maintain serial cataloging records in the OCLC database. Guided by recent trends to streamline cataloging and make it more manageable, the project was inspired by an effort to preserve unique data from RLIN records migrating to OCLC. Hear how the project aims to reduce duplication and make consortial catalog maintenance faster, easier and more accurate, by sharing the burden of maintenance and improving records for everyone.


3. Cost of Resource Discovery: Proposing a CORE Standard

Friday, June 6, 2008; 3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

Presenters:

* Ed Riding, SirsiDynix
* Ted Koppel, Auto-Graphics
* Jeff Aipperspach, SerialsSolutions

As one of the ERMI II objectives, the Cost of Resource Exchange is a developing standard which facilitates the transfer of cost, budget and vendor information from the Integrated Library System's Acquisitions module to the Electronic Resource Management System. This session describes the background and goals of this standard, as well as its status and next steps. We will also review the actual data elements and process flow of the information exchange.


4. Marketing Library Database Services to End Users

Friday, June 6, 2008; 3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Presenters:

* Brie Betz, Elsevier
* Stephanie Willen Brown, University of Connecticut
* Deb Barberi, University of Connecticut

This session will concentrate on outreach programs that stimulate database usage, create end-user awareness and promote the value of information services provided by the library. Based on customer outreach programs that Elsevier has developed in collaboration with librarians, we will share experiences with innovative approaches to promoting a database and see how different institutions have implemented these marketing tactics. A panel of 3 presenters -- one publisher (Elsevier) and two librarians -- will discuss implementation of various outreach programs that have been implemented, looking at different marketing approaches such as customized online trainings, a student ambassador program, online quizzes and onsite programs such as user training, user registration and brief demos for customization features.

Speed Dating

Friday, 4:30 p.m - 5:30 p.m.
Facilitator:

Yvette Diven, Serials Solutions

Speed Dating is back! This is an expansion of the highly popular 2007 meet-the-publisher speed rounds. This year's event will once again give you a chance to get together in a non-commercial atmosphere to discuss key serials issues with colleagues who tackle serials from the 'other side of the aisle.' Don't miss out on this unique opportunity for networking, learning, and sharing your perspective on serials.


Tactics Group III


1. Using Institutional and Library Identifiers to Ensure Access to Electronic Resources

Sunday, June 8, 2008; 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Presenters:

* Helen Henderson, Ringgold
* Don Hamparian, OCLC
* John Shaw, Sage Publications

A panel of vendors (publisher, OCLC and Ringgold) will talk about recent initiatives to make sure that libraries maintain access to the electronic resources they have purchased and that all their users get to use the resources to which they are entitled. Various projects like the Journal Supply Chain Project, OCLC WorldCat registry and Ringgold's Identify database used by publishers are beginning to help librarians centralize their IP registration, ensure that agent changes are correctly processed by publishers, and cope with the transfer of subscriber lists between publishers. All these should help to ease the crises of the annual renewal cycle.




2. The Sting of Releasing Print Journals: Surviving the Transition to an Online Environment

Sunday, June 8, 2008; 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Presenters:

* Michael Arthur, University of Central Florida
* Ellen Safley, University of Texas at Dallas
* Debbie Montgomery, University of Texas at Dallas
* Carol Ann Borchert, University of South Florida

Libraries continue to struggle with the transition to an online environment. The presenters will discuss periodical cuts and the transition to online only subscriptions at three large academic libraries. Their journey included identifying potential titles, balancing consortial arrangements, considering available online archives, analyzing statistics, time and budget constraints, binding and available space, and patron demands. The motivation for reducing print will vary from one library to another. However, most libraries will share some or all of the factors to be considered when making the necessary changes. Proper planning can help take the sting out of print reductions.


3. Workflow Challenges: Does Technology Dictate Workflow?
Sunday, June 8, 2008; 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.


Presenters:

* Vicki L. Parsons, Georgia Gwinnett College
* Jennifer J. Leffler, University of Northern Colorado
* Jessie Copeland, Georgia Gwinnett College

With all of the advantages of the electronic information resources available to libraries, there are also opportunities to rethink traditional workflow and job responsibilities in the areas of materials and technical services. Responding to the changes brought by electronic resources, two libraries have changed their workflows to meet the needs of the environment. Georgia Gwinnett College Library created a new position, blending aspects of cataloger, electronic resource librarian and technical services coordinator. This position represents an attempt to proactively respond to the complexity of managing the increasingly diverse and complex academic library collection. Job duties formally assigned to acquisitions, cataloging and serials became part of the University of Northern Colorado's new position, the Technical Services Librarian - Electronic Initiatives. Together, these changes represent 2 unique ways of dealing with the impact electronic information resources have had on traditional library procedures.



4. Journal Title Display and Citation Practices

Sunday, June 8, 2008; 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Presenters:

* Les Hawkins, Library of Congress
* Regina Reynolds, Library of Congress
* Steve Shadle, University of Washington

Accurate display of journal titles on provider web sites has been a topic of discussion among serialists for several years. Links and title displays that do not accurately reflect the title history of a serial hinder access to articles originally published and cited under earlier titles. Recently, efforts in NISO and the UKSG have acknowledged a need to develop common practices for accurate title citation and display for a variety of purposes. These include ensuring that knowledge bases for linking and other services have accurate information for article delivery. Accurate transmission of title information also enhances transactions among publishers, libraries, and service providers. The presenters of this session seek to enhance communication among the stakeholders and gather ideas for a formal collaborative effort to resolve the problem.



5. Improving OpenURL Metadata


Sunday, June 8, 2008; 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Presenter:

* Glen Wiley, Cornell University

All libraries with OpenURL resolvers and electronic collections worldwide struggle with the metadata quality errors by content providers. The metadata quality is problematic in both what exists with inconsistencies and what is clearly missing from the OpenURL metadata. The qualitative evaluation of content providers' metadata is a necessary action in order to ultimately improve the library services to our users. The proposed project will create a repository for OpenURLs that librarians can submit for analysis, and a central hub to experiment with different approaches to the measuring the quality of OpenURL metadata. The project involves several steps. First, the project will involve system prototyping where we will create rating system, metadata application profiles, software tools to accomplish the project, and documentation of the process. Following, there will be beta testing of the system and processes. After we have data set from many institutions, we will generate various reports on the errors and quality of an array of content providers. As the collection of data grows, reports will be published to the library and information community via the project website/blog and comments will be sought on the process and rating system. Revisions of the rating system and application profiles will evolve as more OpenURL Quality project reports and feedback are available. We will monitor the improvements in quality of OpenURL collected over a two year period and evaluate the project.